What was your dream when you were young?

This is a question I often ask at the first meeting with whomever I meet. I am always curious about whether or not people are living the dream they had since childhood. To be honest, I found that this is not the case for most of the people I’ve talked to. My dream was to become an astronomer. I wanted to study the universe. Then I found other interests and ended up being a marketing strategy consultant and a photographer which I love at the moment but this obviously wasn’t my dream when I was young.

Are you living your dream life?

Meet Jenny Wheatley. A young woman who wanted to become a pediatrician when she was young, ultimately became a college admission consultant. But through my conversations with her, I learned that she did in fact fulfill her dream because the reason why she wanted to be a pediatrician was to simply help the youth. As a president of Admission Masters, she was able to help a lot of students achieve their college goals. Occasionally students visit her again even after they go to college to catch up with her and ask her for career advice. This proves that Jenny has been really helpful to the students in her life. 

Jenny Wheatly – President of Admission Masters

Before being a college counselor, Jenny was an elementary school teacher. She liked teaching but she wanted to do more. What she realized while being a teacher was that “it takes one teacher to make a difference.” Students can have a good teacher and they could also have a bad teacher, which could motivate what they are going to be like for the next year. But being a counselor was the bridge between elementary, middle, high school and college. So she could see students continue to be successful even after a high school.

College Admission
Being a counselor was a bridge for a lot of students.

Who do you remember the most?

I asked. People tend to answer this sort of question with one example. Instead Jenny told me three types of students that she remembers the most. First one is Dorothy who got accepted to Stanford a few years ago. Dorothy was a very smart and creative but most importantly she had a kind heart. Dorothy cared about her mom in a lot of ways — she was honest, genuine and compassionate. Jenny believes she got accepted to Stanford because of the things beyond her academic achievement — such as her personality.

College admission counselor

Other types of students she remembers the most are the ones who are really unmotivated. For example, one of her students in their freshman year didn’t want to study. They didn’t want to go to college. Then after working with them for two years, they changed completely. In their senior year, they did so well and ended up going to UC Berkeley. This was amazing because Jenny was able to witness their growth and maturity over the years.

The third type of student she remembers is the type who is very smart but lacks a good personality. The type of student who gets a perfect SAT score and perfect GPA, yet refused to participate in extracurricular activities. Basically a student who shows no interest in any community involvement beyond what happens in their classrooms. Jenny mentioned to me that he ended up going to Columbia and recently told her that he wants to become a doctor, so he could help people.

Where are you headed?

Motivation

Motivation is a very strong word. If you teach someone to do something, he or she may or may not do it right once you are gone. But if you become their motivator, whether or not you are there, it’s no longer an issue. In this sense, college admission counseling works like a great motivator to students. Students might be able to meet good teachers from time to time in school years but you can’t choose a teacher. However, you certainly can choose a good college admission counselor. Start today and find your motivator for your college admissions journey.

Should you be interested in Admission Masters, check out this posting.

Admission Masters, Your mission control center for college admission

One thought on “College Admission Counselor – Bridge between elementary, middle, high school and college.

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